Travelling Has Two L’s

A wise traveller never despises his own country. -Carlo Goldoni

home1In the past I may have frustrated fellow language nerds with my spellings of ‘travelling/travelled/traveller,’ using two L’s. This is a purposeful decision, though that explanation alone may not calm the most extreme logophiles.

It has taken a while to teach my iPhone to add an extra L; hopefully it won’t take quite as long to explain to you. Then perhaps you will join hands with me, and we will become activists of language, and we will convince Mr. Webster himself or his descendants or whoever runs the dictionary now and we will convert our nation to the Double-L System.

home4I like to dream big.

Here’s my short reason: uhh…it’s just better.

Now join me! Let’s change the world! You may have to do some travelling to get to the DLS National Convention in the boonies of Montana. Since I’m head of the project I get to choose the location.

Travelling.

There’s something thicker and bolder about ‘travelling,’ as though it is capable of holding more experience. It’s courageous in a hardy, rugged, Go-West-Young-Man kind of way.

It also seems to be an older form of the word (probably just because it’s a British spelling. Don’t judge; I like British English. And all things old.)

I am currently writing from Wareham MA (more on that later) but before two days ago I hadn’t done much travelling in about six weeks. I was ‘in limbo,’ chillaxing at home and preparing for the next major transition of my life: THE REAL WORLD (queue music which expresses hardship and impending doom).

home3However, if you know me, I refuse to give in to the norms of what life is ‘supposed to be,’ so to spice up my transition into THE REAL WORLD, at which everyone from random person on the phone from tech support to the UPS delivery guy have been not-so-subtly hinting at for many months now, … I am moving to a place I have never been before. That way, I can ‘settle down’ (for a bit) and ‘travel’ all at the same time: new sights, new people, new coffee shops to test new chai, new parks to run new routes.

I’m still on the job hunt, so hit me up if you know anyone in the greater Seattle area who needs help with words. Or anything related to words.

home2I like words.

Travelled.

.past tense//a state of being.

.I travelled//I am travelled.

I had three goals during my six weeks at home: sleep, ride horses, spend time with family and friends because Seattle may or may not eat me alive and maybe I will never come back and then at least they will have fresh memories of times we spent together.

I doubt that, but really, who knows when I’ll be back in the 406. (That’s Montana, for you Out-of-Staters. There are few states in the Union that use one area code for all their inhabitants, and we’re proud to be one of them.)

Fact of the Day: According to the 2013 US Census, Montana has approx. 29,000 less people than Rhode Island, the smallest state.

I would like to announce that I am fully caught up on sleep. If you are curious about yourself, use the car test: if you can stay awake in the passenger seat for more than 10 minutes in ideal temperatures with a warm fall sun on your face, then you have successfully recovered from all those college all-nighters.

Mom and I found our old horse trails and biked our way up and down the valley, and Dad and I ‘took our guns out for a walk.’ We also attended a number of rodeos.

home7Routine. That thing I have not had since April. That mysterious thing that is so peaceful and so suffocating at the same time. It is a benefit of staying in the same city for more than four nights in a row, which I did not do from the middle of May to the end of August, except a short stint in Haiti. Routine is a benefit of being home.

Home routine is: wake up at the same time every day, so my body can be on a normal sleeping and eating schedule. Workout six times a week. Feed the horses and chickens twice each day. Relax in the evenings.

Traveller.

A traveller can find joy in rest, and peace in routine.

And then there’s the stranger routines that develop: Mom and I decided to test our workout progress by hiking Goat Mountain once a week four weeks in a row. I discovered if I jog the flatter parts I can shave my time down almost to 35 minutes.

home6A traveller has more blood than a traveler. More music. Like the troubadours of old.

A traveller has more focus on the journey: the 35 minutes instead of just the peak.

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Scuola – LdM ‘the Magnificent’

Lorenzo de’ Medici Institute was named for Lorenzo the Magnificent, a ruler of Florence from the famous Medici family during the Renaissance era; also one of my historical heroes. Besides being a wise and cunning ruler, Lorenzo was also a great patron of the arts, and belonged to a group of people referred to as ‘humanists’: those leaders of the time who supported the ‘rebirth’ and flowering of art, literature, philosophy, religion, science, etc. after the Dark Ages.

And, like most of my heroes, Lorenzo was a skilled with horses and a brave in war.

Marry me, please.

photo

I am moving into my second week of school, and as of my first glance, my classes are proving to be no less ‘Magnificent’ than their namesake.

History this semester is, not surprisingly, ‘The Rise and Fall of the Medici,’ following the family from the 15th to the 17th century. I’m stoked, to say the least. My professor, Romana Priessler, is tall and beautiful with a face of a carved marble Roman statue brought to life. She makes no expression while she speaks ever so slowly, except the faintest hint of a smile when she says:

‘My English is not so great, and you may correct me if you like. But I will correct you on Medici.’

(Italians draw out the first syllable: ‘MAY-de-chi.’)

My history class goes hand-in-hand with my art class, “The Built Environment of Florence.”

(Concordia said I need an art class to graduate anyway, so why not take it in Florence?)

Florence above

This class, taught by Elisabetta Morici, will mostly cover architecture during the Renaissance period, although our first introductory class was mostly a lecture about the beginnings of the city. It was founded by the Romans and was called ‘Florentia,’ and was built in the valley near the Arno River, where it is today. The native and peace-loving Etruscans were forced up into the hills and settled there.

Florentia can still be seen today: our professor pulled up a map of modern Florence, showed us which roads were Roman, and pointed out where the forum and the amphitheater once stood. The roads still exist, cutting right angles through a city mostly comprised of curving, winding, narrow, crazy-Italian-driver-infested streets. The forum is now the Piazza dell’ Repubblica; I pass near it on my way to school each day. And the remains of the amphitheater can be seen in the steeply slanted road I hike up to get to class; my feet are passing over hundreds of seats now covered by paved roads.

With a half hour left of class, Professor Morici was teaching about the Byzantine walls and towers (over the years, Florence had seven different layers of protective walls built; these were the second set, built just after the fall of the Roman Empire).

In one fluid motion she shut down the computer and grabbed her small leather bag.

‘Let’s go look at them,’ she said.

With wide eyes, all 25 students stood and followed her silently as she led us outside, around the San Lorenzo church, through the Piazza dell’ Repubblica, and down a narrow alleyway.

This is why I am studying abroad, I thought. I peeked at the syllabus: almost every class period in this course will include some type of walking tour or museum/church visit.

hotel-brunelleschi

Suddenly the street opened up to a small square where several couples were sitting down to lunch, and behind them stood the Torre della Pagliazza, now the Hotel Brunelleschi (rooms start at 950 euro per night–I checked).

There is a small museum in the basement of the original foundations of the tower, too small to take a class of 25. So I returned yesterday and went by myself.

Francecso Petrini is a character. (I’m giving their names mostly for my own benefit, I think–I love the way Italian names roll off my tongue…) Unlike Professor Priessler, Petrini moves his entire face, no, his entire body, when he lectures in class. His accent is quite thick, but it makes me pay attention. Between wild hand motions and the use of the chalkboard, I can usually figure out what he’s talking about.

He teaches my ‘Age of Heroes’ literature class, in which we will be studying Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey, and a little of Virgil’s Aeneid. I’ve read the lattermost in its entirety, and loved it, though I am ashamed as a history major to say I have never completely read the other two. But I will soon!

All of my professors, but Professor Petrini in particular, stress that they are not Catholic. For so many years, my education has been specifically Christian, and I have caught myself on more than one occasion assuming that is true for all education.  I find it interesting that the professors still adhere to the religious principles of Catholicism, and Petrini even took a large chunk of our class period to make it clear he believed Jesus, whether God or not, was undoubtedly a historical figure. I suppose it is natural for the mind to seek some type of moral compass.

Ornella Pettini teaches my Italian Language class. After one week I can ask someone, ‘How do you say —– in Italian?’ And I can say ‘To be or not to be,’ mostly as a practice for Italian verbs. I don’t think Italians actually walk around saying that .

But I was proud of myself the other day when a random Alessandro sat down next to me outside the Tribunale while I was studying, and I was able to make minimal conversation  with him about the weather and the day of the week.

I can also say ‘vino.’ That’s important.